MESQUITE POLL RESULTS: RESIDENTS WANT SMOKE-FREE INDOOR AIR

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Key findings of a May 2016 telephone survey in Mesquite, Nev., conducted by Public Opinion Strategies (Clients include Fortune 500 companies, Industry Associations and Coalitions, 13 U.S. Senators, 6 Governors, and 65 Members of Congress.)

A clear majority of Mesquite voters (61%) favor a local ordinance requiring 100% smoke-free air in all workplaces including bars and casinos, with half (50%) strongly favoring such a policy to protect all workers.

 

Mesquite support for 100% smoke-free workplaces spans all types of people surveyed:

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  • Comes from all ages of men and women.
  • Stays steady across party lines (Republicans, 60%; Independents,58%, and Democrats, 71%).
  • Is high regardless of indivudals’ education or socioeconomic status.

Secondhand smoke is a public health hazard. Mesquite voters (81%) overwhelimingly agree.

It is important for all indoor workplaces, restaurants, bars and casinos to be 100% smoke-free. Mesquite voters (74%) overwhelmingly agree. More than half (54%) say it is very important.

The rights of employees and customers to breathe clean air indoor in restaurants, bars and casinos is more important than the rights of smokers to smoke or owners to allow smoking. The majority of voters (63%) concur; 55% believe employee and customer rights are much more important.

Supporting smoke-free workplaces is good for candidates. A a clear majority of voters (55%) say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate who supports a local ordinance requiring 100% smoke-free workplaces for all Mesquite workers, including those who work in bars and casinos.

More business for bars and casinos. The majority of Mesquite voters (58%) say they are more likely to patronize bars and casinos if they are smoke-free.

 

About secondhand smoke:

  • The U.S. Surgeon General has declared there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke.  Even brief exposure to secondhand smoke is harmful and has immediate negative health effects.1,2,3
  • Secondhand smoke causes nearly 42,000 deaths each year from heart disease and lung

cancer among adult nonsmokers in the United States.1

  • Secondhand smoke need never be an occupational hazard for workers, including casino, restaurant, bar, and hotel employees.

About the poll:

  • Telephone survey of 277 registered voters including cell phone interviews
  • Survey was conducted May 14-19, 2016
  • Conducted by Public Opinion Strategies

 

About the Smoke-free Mesquite coalition:

Mesquite's Citizens for Clean Indoor Air is a local coalition working to improve the health of Mesquite's workers, residents, and visitors, by protecting them from from secondhand smoke in indoor public places. Secondhand smoke is a public health problem affecting one third of Mesquite workers. Residents and visitors to Nevada benefit from Nevada's Clean Indoor Air Act, which prohibits smoking in many workplaces and indoor public places. But not everyone is protected. The exemptions in the current state law leave thousands of employees and patrons in nightclubs, casinos, and some bars still breathing the cancer-causing chemicals in secondhand smoke. Everyone deserves to breathe clean indoor air. No one should have to sacrifice their health for a paycheck.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, the American Lung Association, the American Heart Association, and the Southern Nevada Health District  support Mesquite Citizens for Clean Indoor Air in their effort to eliminate public exposure to secondhand smoke, which is a key way to protect nonsmokers, children and workers from the deadly effects of secondhand smoke.

 

  1. U.S.  Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress:_A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of Smoking and Health, 2014 (accessed 2015 Aug 20).
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What it Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 (accessed 2015 Aug 20).
  3. National Toxicology Program. Report on Carcinogens, Thirteenth Edition. Research Triangle Park NC): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 2014 (accessed 2015 Aug 20).


For a downloadable PDF of these survey results, click here.

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